`

Country Life

The first day of the Battle of the Somme was the costliest in British military history. Here, in abridged extracts from Jolyon Fenwick's book Zero Hour, he explains why we shall always remember July 1, 1916.


Read more at http://www.countrylife.co.uk/country-life/battle-of-the-somme-britains-bloodiest-day-in-memoriam-90344#yjYvqdHlicQPlhex.99

Harpers Bazaar

To mark the centenary of the Battle of the Somme, the Sladmore Contemporary gallery in Mayfair will be hosting an exhibition by the photographer Jolyon Fenwick, titled The Zero Hour Panoramas, 100 Years On: Views from the Parapet of the Somme. Fenwick has captured the historic battle grounds as they are today but with hand-annotated notes on the events as they took place in 1916. There are 14 photographs in the poignant series; see a preview of some of them below.

The Zero Hour Panoramas will run from 1 to 15 July at Sladmore Contemporary, 32 Bruton Place, W1J. Visit www.sladmorecontemporary.com

Tatler July 2016

The Zero Hour Panoramas private view

Jolyon Fenwick and Lady Goodlad

On the eve of the Battle of the Somme centenary anniversary, Mayfair's Sladmore Contemporary gallery threw open its doors for a very special evening to mark the opening of Jolyon Fenwick's exhibition, The Zero Hours PanoramasJemima GoldsmithRobin Birley and Lord Dalmeny were among those who gathered for a first glimpse of 14 incredible panoramic photographs, which have taken over two years to create. Unsurprisingly, photographer and author Jolyon was in huge demand during the evening - retelling stories from his time spent with families of the fallen.

Evening Standard July 2016

Angus and Jemima in the wars

To the Sladmore Contemporary gallery in Mayfair last night, which is marking the centenary of the Battle of the Somme with a series of panoramas by photographer Jolyon Fenwick, called The Zero Hour Panoramas.

Guests at the private view, including Jemima Khan and Angus Deayton were shown the oddly sunny photographs of the tragic battlefield. “Everyone thinks of the Somme and mud, but that wasn’t till later,” Fenwick said. “Looking out that morning, the view would have been exactly the same [as now]. Of course without the war memorials... I knew people who fought at the Somme, and now they are brown sepia photographs.”